Jan
25
Sat
Craft Workshop: Novel Structure with Brady Udall @ The Community Library
Jan 25 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Craft Workshop: Novel Structure with Brady Udall @ The Community Library | Ketchum | Idaho | United States

Writing a novel, a screenplay, a memoir—or any long form story—can be a messy and confusing process. This class will offer simple techniques and guiding principles to help you as you craft your next masterpiece. Join The Community Library Writer-In-Residence Brady Udall for this one-time class, which will focus on discussing the craft of novel writing.

Registration is required for this workshop. Register through the Community Library’s website.

This workshop is limited to 15 students, and we will form a wait list if the class becomes full.

Contact Martha Williams at mwilliams@comlib.org or 208-806-2621 with any questions.

Jan
31
Fri
Winter Read Kickoff and “Righting a Wrong” Exhibition Opening @ Regional History Museum
Jan 31 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Winter Read Kickoff and "Righting a Wrong" Exhibition Opening @ Regional History Museum | Ketchum | Idaho | United States

Join us at The Community Library’s Regional History Museum for the opening of “Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans and World War II.”

During the reception, we’ll also launch The Community Library’s 2020 WINTER READ: “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet.” We’ll be giving away copies of the novel and sharing information about upcoming programs focusing on the Minidoka National Historic Site in Idaho, which is a setting of the novel.

The “Righting a Wrong” poster exhibit is on display at the Regional History Museum from January 31, 2020 through March 21, 2020, courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) program.

The WINTER READ will include distribution of free copies of the book, a presentation by author Jamie Ford on March 12, history exhibits at the Library and the Regional History Museum, and free discussion groups and educational programs throughout February and March focusing on the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II, in Idaho and throughout the country.

Visit The Community Library events calendar for more information.

The 2020 Winter Read has been generously sponsored by the Spur Community Foundation and Carlyn Ring.

Feb
5
Wed
The Legacy of Minoru Yasui and WWII Japanese American Incarceration @ The Community Library
Feb 5 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
The Legacy of Minoru Yasui and WWII Japanese American Incarceration @ The Community Library | Ketchum | Idaho | United States

As part of our WINTER READ and focus on the Minidoka National Historic Site and Japanese American incarceration during World War II, The Community Library welcomes civil rights investigator Jessica Asai. Her lecture will speak to the legacy of Minoru Yasui’s Supreme Court case protesting the war-time incarceration and the implications for citizenship and civil liberties today.

Jessica Asai is yonsei, a fourth generation Japanese American, and was raised in Hood River, Oregon where her family has farmed for four generations. After receiving a B.A. in Politics from Willamette University, Jessica moved to Honolulu and worked in marketing and government relations. Upon returning to Oregon, she graduated from Lewis & Clark Law School and practiced corporate and employment law as an associate at a mid-size firm. In 2010, Jessica transitioned away from practicing law and became a civil rights investigator for the Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Department (AAEO) at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU). At OHSU, she conducts internal civil rights investigations, facilitates the reasonable accommodation interactive process, and provides advice and training to administrators, faculty, staff, and students on civil rights, equity, and Title IX. Jessica is a founding board member of the Oregon Asian Pacific American Bar Association (OAPABA), and contributed to the team effort that successfully nominated attorney and civil rights activist Minoru Yasui for a 2015 Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. More recently, in December 2018, she was appointed to serve on the Oregon Commission for Asian and Pacific Islander Affairs (OCAPIA).

Minoru Yasui was an American lawyer and son of Japanese immigrants who fought the restrictions imposed by Executive Order 9066 that allowed the military to set up exclusion zones, curfews, and ultimately the internment of Japanese Americans during the war. The Order was signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942, and Minoru Yasui’s case was the first to test the constitutionality of the curfews targeted at minority groups.

This program is in collaboration with Friends of Minidoka, a nonprofit that engages in and supports education, research and historic preservation of the WWII incarceration experience. They strive to pass on the history, legacy, and lessons of civil liberties through transforming and inspiring experiences for the general public and those with personal and familial ties to Minidoka, and they work with partners, including the National Park Service, to accomplish these goals.

Feb
23
Sun
The Aging Brain with Jennifer Hubbard @ The Community Library
Feb 23 @ 5:00 pm – 5:30 pm
The Aging Brain with Jennifer Hubbard @ The Community Library | Ketchum | Idaho | United States

Join Jennifer Hubbard M.S. Neuro-Science, M.S. Gerontology, for a talk exploring the latest science behind cognitive brain function.

Feb
26
Wed
“Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp” and Q&A with Hanako Wakatsuki @ The Community Library
Feb 26 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

As part of our WINTER READ and focus on the Minidoka National Historic Site and Japanese American incarceration during World War II, The Community Library welcomes Hanako Wakatsuki, Chief of Interpretation at Minidoka National Historic Site.

The evening will feature a screening of Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp, produced by North Shore Productions for the National Park Service. The 30-minute film tells the story of a group of Americans and their incarceration by the U.S. government in the High Desert of southern Idaho, purely on the basis of race. The film also explores the lasting impact of incarceration on Japanese-Americans, through decades of shame and silence, before the community took a stand for redress, and examines the relevance of their story for civil rights today.

A Q&A with Hanako Wakatsuki will follow the screening.

Mar
12
Thu
Winter Read Closing: “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet” with Jamie Ford @ The Community Library
Mar 12 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Winter Read Closing: “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet” with Jamie Ford @ The Community Library | Ketchum | Idaho | United States

The Community Library’s 2020 Winter Read concludes with a presentation and book signing with Jamie Ford, author of “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet.”

Jamie Ford is a Northwest author most widely known for his bestselling Seattle-based novels. His debut, “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet,” spent two years on the New York Times bestseller list, won the 2010 Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature, and was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award, the Pacific Northwest Book Award, and the Langum Prize for Historical Fiction. “Hotel” was named the #1 Book Club pick in 2010 by the American Bookseller Association and is now read widely in schools all across the country. This multi-cultural tale was adapted by Book-It Repertory Theatre, and has recently been optioned for a stage musical and for film.

The Community Library’s 2020 WINTER READ explores the history and effects today of the incarceration of Japanese Americans in the U.S. during World War II. Throughout February and March we invite the community to read “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet,” Jamie Ford’s novel that focuses on two families, of Chinese and Japanese ancestry, who experience discrimination, incarceration, loss, and friendship during the early war years in Seattle. The Minidoka War Relocation Center, Idaho’s own site of war-time incarceration where more than 9,000 Japanese Americans were imprisoned from 1942-45, is a setting of the novel. The national historic site is located just eighty miles south of Ketchum. Join us as we engage in conversation around this important regional and national civil liberties history.

The 2020 Winter Read has been generously sponsored by the Spur Community Foundation and Carlyn Ring.

Jul
8
Wed
Free Lecture – Giving Done Right @ The Community Library
Jul 8 @ 5:30 pm
Free Lecture - Giving Done Right @ The Community Library | Ketchum | Idaho | United States

Spur Foundation presents Giving Done Right, a free lecture with Phil Buchanan, President of the Center for Effective Philanthropy and author of Giving Done Right.

Attendees will receive a complimentary copy of Buchanan’s book, Giving Done Right.

Phil Buchanan, president of the Center for Effective Philanthropy (CEP) is a passionate advocate for the importance of philanthropy and the nonprofit sector and deeply committed to the cause of helping foundations and individual donors to maximize their impact. Hired in 2001 as the organization’s first chief executive, Phil has led the growth of CEP into the leading provider of data and insight on philanthropic effectiveness. CEP has been widely credited with bringing the voices of stakeholders to funders and with contributing to an increased emphasis on key elements of effectiveness.

Phil is author of Giving Done Right: Effective Philanthropy and Making Every Dollar Count, released in the spring of 2019. He is co-author of many CEP research reports, a columnist for The Chronicle of Philanthropy, and a frequent blogger for the CEP Blog. Phil is also co-founder of YouthTruth, an initiative of CEP’s designed to harness student perceptions to help educators and funders accelerate improvements in K–12 schools and classrooms. In 2016, he was named the Nonprofit Times “influencer of the year.” Phil serves on the boards of directors of Philanthropy Massachusetts and the National Council on Aging.

Sep
24
Thu
An Evening with Hisham Matar @ The Community Library
Sep 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
An Evening with Hisham Matar @ The Community Library

Join us for an evening with Hisham Matar, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Return. The memoir, and Matar’s award winning fiction and nonfiction works, address themes of loss and exile while finding comfort and clarity in art.